Insomnia: what is the right diet to sleep well

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Robert Maurer
@robertmaurer
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The relationship between diet and a good night's rest is much more closely related than you think and, if incorrect, it risks triggering a vicious circle that causes damage on both fronts.


A two-way correlation

Research conducted at King's College London and published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition involved 42 volunteers divided into two groups: one half was asked to observe a whole series of rules to promote rest (such as those indicated below) for a week, while the other was left free to behave according to their habits. Everyone has recorded in a diary the hours of sleep and the diet followed during the seven days, while a normal wrist tracker monitored night activity. Well, not only the first group saw increase the time of rest (from 52 to 90 minutes): once awake, the subjects who were part of it also found themselves in eat healthier, reducing the consumption of sugars and carbohydrates in favor of healthier and "light" foods. And this cause-and-effect relationship apparently already existed as children.



Another and more articulated study by Rutgers University of New Jersey (USA), which involved 177 thousand American students and was proposed in detail in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, in fact highlighted that the 40% of children and teenagers slept less than necessary and that this lack was associated in the majority of cases with bad eating habits, if not obesity.

As if that weren't enough, suffering from insomnia can also make you find yourself ... eating alone and therefore presumably in a disorderly manner. Yes, because a recent work from the University of California at Berkeley (USA), published in the journal Nature Communications, warns that those who spend bad nights tend to be grumpy and even "develop a kind of social repulsion towards othersAs the American researchers wrote.



Always based on the latest research and with the tips of the nutritionist Maria Papavasileiou, which also developed the diet against insomnia proposed in the gallery at the bottom of the article, let's see then how to gain in rest and also in weight-shape.


The importance of dinner

To have sweet dreams, dinner is the key meal of the day. «It will have to be composed mainly from carbohydrates», Explains doctor Papavasileiou,« with an advantage not only for the quality of rest. According to a study conducted by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and published in the journal Obesity and Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, those taken with the evening meal have a positive effect on hormones that control the sense of hunger and satiety, even improving insulin resistance. Consequently, include one in the evening meal portion of whole grains (such as rice, spelled, barley) is a great move for too keep your calories in check and keep yourself in line».


The secret weapon? 2 kiwis

Besides follow the anti-isomnia menu proposed by our expert, follow the tip suggested by a research of the Medical University of Taipei (Taiwan): consume 2 ripe kiwis about an hour before going to bed to facilitate both the duration and depth of sleep. "About the ehigh content of serotonin and folic acid of this fruit », comments doctor Papavasileiou.


Eating Mediterranean is also good


Olives, fish and seasonal fruit: foods very common on our tables and which also help sleep. This is ensured by a research by the Harokopio University of Athens, published in Geriatrics & Gerontology International, which examined 1.650 subjects "over 65" finding a direct relationship between their sleep quality and a greater or lesser adherence to the Mediterranean diet.


In particular, according to the authors of the study they would be precisely the foods mentioned above to promote rest because good sources of melatonin, essential for the correct regulation of the sleep-wake rhythm.


And now browse the gallery e discover the most relaxing menu there is!

Monday



Breakfast

• Herbal tea to taste

• 60 g of wholemeal bread

• 30 g of jam with no added sugar

Snack

• 150 g of fresh seasonal fruit or 40 g natural dried fruit

Lunch

• 200 g of raw, boiled, sautéed or baked seasonal vegetables

• 80 g of turkey breast

• 60 g of wholemeal bread

Merenda

• 1 white yogurt or 1 square of dark chocolate

Price

• 80 g of spelled with 150 g of mushrooms (recipe below)


For 1 person

Clean 150 g of mushrooms and sauté them in a pan, adding garlic and parsley (quantity to taste). Boil 80 g of wholemeal spelled in a pot of water for about 45 minutes.

Add the mushrooms and season with 10 g of extra virgin olive oil.

Tuesday

Breakfast

• Herbal tea to taste

• 60 g of wholemeal bread

• 30 g of jam with no added sugar

Snack

• 150 g of fresh seasonal fruit or 40 g of natural dried fruit

Lunch

• 120 g of mozzarella or ricotta from cow or sheep

• 200 g of raw, boiled, sautéed or baked seasonal vegetables

• 60 g of wholemeal bread

Merenda

• 1 white yogurt or 1 square of dark chocolate

Price

• Mixed legume soup (recipe below)


For 1 person

Soak 50 g of dried legume mix for about 8 hours. Then clean 150 g of a mix of carrot, celery, onion and cherry tomatoes before adding the legumes. Boil everything for 45 minutes and season with 10 g of extra virgin olive oil.

Wednesday

Breakfast

• Herbal tea to taste

• 60 g of wholemeal bread

• 30 g of jam with no added sugar

Snack

• 150 g of fresh seasonal fruit or 40 g of natural dried fruit

Lunch

• 50 g of legume soup or salad

• 150 g of seasonal vegetables cooked in steam or in the oven

• 60 g of wholemeal bread

Merenda

• 1 white yogurt or 1 square of dark chocolate

Price

• Wholemeal pasta with yellow pumpkin (recipe below)


For 1 person

Clean 150 g of yellow pumpkin, cut it into chunks and sauté it in a pan with garlic and rosemary. Boil 80 g of wholemeal pasta and drain it al dente. Then add the pumpkin and season with 10 g of extra virgin olive oil.

Thursday

Breakfast

• Herbal tea to taste

• 60 g of wholemeal bread

• 30 g of jam with no added sugar

Snack

• 150 g of fresh seasonal fruit or 40 g of natural dried fruit

Lunch

• 80 g of brown rice (or spelled or barley)

• 150 g of steamed seasonal vegetables

Merenda

• 150 g of fresh seasonal fruit or 1 white yogurt

Price

• Turbot with potatoes (recipe below)

• 60 g of wholemeal bread


For 1 person

Peel 150 g of potatoes and cut them into thin slices. Place 200 g of the turbot fillet already filleted on a baking sheet and arrange the potato slices until they are completely covered with the fish. Season with 10 g of extra virgin olive oil and a little rosemary. Bake in the oven at 180 ° C for about 20 minutes.

Friday

Breakfast

• Herbal tea to taste

• 60 g of wholemeal bread

• 30 g of jam with no added sugar

Snack

• 150 g of fresh seasonal fruit or 40 g of natural dried fruit

Lunch

• Chicken with lemon and ginger (see recipe below) • 60 g of wholemeal bread

Merenda

• 150 g of fresh seasonal fruit or 1 square of dark chocolate

Price

• 80 g of brown rice (or spelled or barley)

• 150 g of sautéed seasonal vegetables


For 1 person

Place 200 g of boneless chicken thigh on a baking sheet, grate the zest of an organic lemon and ginger root to taste on the meat. Drizzle with 10 g of extra virgin olive oil and cook in the oven at 180 ° C for about 20 minutes.

Saturday

Breakfast

• Herbal tea to taste

• 60 g of wholemeal bread

• 30 g of jam with no added sugar

Snack

• 150 g of fresh seasonal fruit or 40 g of natural dried fruit

Lunch

• 2 eggs in omelette or in the shell

• 200 g of seasonal vegetables in the oven or in soup

• 60 g of wholemeal bread

Merenda

• 150 g of fresh seasonal fruit or 1 white yogurt

Price

• Venere rice with prawns and zucchini (see recipe below)


For 1 person

Clean 150 g of prawns and sauté them in a pan with 150 g of courgettes cut into pieces and 1 clove of garlic. Boil the black rice for 45 minutes and, when cooked, add the mix of shellfish and vegetables. Drizzle with 10 g of extra virgin olive oil.


Sunday

Breakfast

• Herbal tea to taste

• 60 g of wholemeal bread

• 30 g of jam with no added sugar

Snack

• 150 g of fresh seasonal fruit or 40 g of natural dried fruit

Lunch

• 200 g of baked salmon

• 200 g of steamed or sautéed seasonal vegetables

Merenda

• 150 g of fresh seasonal fruit or 1 square of dark chocolate

Price

• Grated cauliflower (recipe below)

• 60 g of wholemeal bread


For 1 person

Boil 200 g of cauliflower in water for a few minutes. Then place it on a baking sheet and sprinkle it with breadcrumbs flavored with parsley, nutmeg, 1 pinch of pepper, 1 tablespoon of grated Parmesan cheese and 10 g of extra virgin olive oil. Bake in the oven at 180 ° C for about 20 minutes.


  • Read also: Insomnia: 6 good habits at the table (and not only)


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